• Knee Arthroscopy

    Knee Arthroscopy is a common surgical procedure performed using an arthroscope, a viewing instrument, to look into the knee joint to diagnose or treat a knee problem. It is a relatively safe procedure and a majority of the patient’s discharge from the hospital on the same day of surgery.

  • Arthroscopic ACL Reconstruction

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is surgery to reconstruct the torn ligament of the knee with a tissue graft. The procedure is performed under general anesthesia. Your surgeon will make two small incisions around your knee. An arthroscope, small video camera, is inserted through one incision to see the inside of the knee joint.

  • Arthroscopic Treatment of
    Patella Instability

    Patellar (knee cap) instability results from one or more dislocations or partial dislocations (subluxations). Patella is the small piece of bone in front of the knee that slides up and down the femoral groove (groove in the femur bone) during bending and stretching movements.

  • Arthroscopic Cartilage &
    Meniscus Repair

    Meniscus is the C-shaped two pieces of cartilage located between thighbone and shin bone that act as shock absorbers and cushion the joints. Meniscal tear may be developed by people of all ages and is more common in individuals who play contact sports.

Arthroscopic Treatment of Patella Instability

The knee can be divided into three compartments: patellofemoral, medial and lateral compartment. The patellofemoral compartment is the compartment in the front of the knee between the knee cap and thigh bone. The medial compartment is the area on the inside portion of the knee, and the lateral compartment is the area on the outside portion of the knee joint. Patellofemoral instability means that the patella (kneecap) moves out of its normal pattern of alignment. This malalignment can damage the underlying soft structures such as muscles and ligaments that hold the knee in place.

Surgery is sometimes needed to help return the patella to a normal tracking path when other non-surgical treatments have failed. The aim of the surgery is to realign the kneecap in the groove and to decrease the Q angle.

Other Related Links

  •  American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
  • International Society for Hip Arthroscopy
  • RYC Orthopaedics
  • American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine
  • The Arthroscopy Association of North America